Brainwaves Fly a Drone

Drones are fun to fly, and it’s possible to do limited flying using brainwaves. The headset senses my brainwaves and transmits them to a small computer. When I increase my attention level, the computer converts the signals and passes them to the drone’s controller, which I have connected to the computer. When I relax my mind, the drone lands.

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Draw on bottles using a CNC plotter made from old printer rollers and other scraps

To label used bottles that would otherwise go to waste, “tuenhidiy” created a CNC plotter that itself consists mostly of scraps!

The machine’s X and Z axes are formed out of a pair of old CD/DVD players, but instead of a traditional Y axis, it actuates two printer rollers to turn a bottle forwards or backwards. This allows the marking pen to be placed in just the right axial position, while still being very similar to a fully Cartesian (XYZ) plotter controls-wise.

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Detecting Pokemon on an Arduino using TinyML and TensorFlow

Using colors to predict whether this is Pikachu or Bulbasaur…

The deployment environments of a machine learning (ML) model are changing. In recent years, we went from locally training models and running them on standalone scripts to deploying them in massive and specialized setups. However, the industry hasn’t been focusing only on large-scaled-productionized ML, but also its small, portable, and accessible counterpart—for machine learning has found a place in embedded systems.

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Kids Light Up Clock 2.0

The first version of my Light Up Clock for Kids I published a few years ago. At the time my wife and I were going crazy with our young kids (between 2 and 4 years old) who could not understand how to “wait for the 7” on the clock before coming in and waking us up early in the morning! Now the youngest (the 4th and hopefully the last) is 3 years old and this clock has been life-saving the last few years! Enhanced over time, it has provided a HUGE solution to our “child-waking-us-up-at-insane-hours-of-the-morning” problem!!!

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Arduino Powered Garage Parking Sensor

We live in a house with a very tight garage, and our relatively big car leaves a tiny space in front. I designed and built this simple project to visually guide the driver into the optimal parking distance, using real-time feedback about how close the car is to the wall in front. In short, it tells you when to stop.

The project uses an ultrasonic sensor and Arduino to measure distance and then displays it on a full-color LED strip as a progress bar. The sensor is mounted on the wall; as the distance between the car and wall shrinks, the light strip shows an increasing number of illuminated LEDs, which also change color from green to amber to red, and then finally, flashing red.

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Bird classification in remote areas with Lacuna Space and The Things Network

Over the past years, The Things Networks has worked around the democratization of the Internet of Things, building a global and crowdsourced LoraWAN network carried by the thousands of users operating their own gateways worldwide. Thanks to Lacuna Space’ satellites constellation, the network coverage goes one step further. Lacuna Space uses LEO (Low-Earth Orbit) satellites to provide LoRaWAN coverage at any point around the globe. Messages received by satellites are then routed to ground stations and forwarded to LoRaWAN service providers such as TTN. This technology can benefit several industries and applications: tracking a vessel not only in harbors but across the oceans, monitoring endangered species in remote areas. All that with only 25mW power (ISM band limit) to send a message to the satellite. This is truly amazing!

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This pen plotter draws detailed maps the size of walls

Christopher Getschmann wanted a wall-sized map of the world. He soon realized, however, that it’s tough to actually buy such a map that’s both beautiful and detailed enough to satisfy his cartographic tastes. While many would simply move on to the next “thing,” Getschmann instead took things into his own hands, and built a pen plotter specifically to draw a massive 2×3 meter map for his wall.

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Zach Frew’s Liquid Lite Brite creates low-res art out of liquid dye

As a child, chances are you came across a Lite-Brite at some point. The toy consisted of a light box with small plastic pegs that fit into a panel and lit up to form a picture. Drawing inspiration from that, mechatronics engineer Zach Frew thought “it would be cool to make a robot that consumes a digital image and outputs a watercolor painting.” What he came up with as a “first step along that path” is a homemade liquid handling workstation to dispense and mix a CMYK dye solution in a 384-well microplate “canvas.”

Liquid distribution is calculated with the help of a Python script that takes a 24×16 pixel image as input and assigns each pixel an RGB value. The “printing” is handled by the common RepRap configuration of an Arduino Mega and a RAMPS 1.4 shield, plus a PCA9685 expander chip. The X, Y, and Z axes move via stepper motors and rails, while color mixing is accomplished using five servo-actuated valves. A stepper-driven peristaltic pump is employed for liquid placement, producing low-resolution yet no less beautiful art.

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